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Butterfly Nebula

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Silk Twill 21”X72”

An artistic interpretation of  this Nebula that looks like delicate butterfly wings are actually roiling cauldrons of  heated gas tearing across space at more than 600,000 miles an hour with the envelopes of gases unleashing  streams of ultraviolet radiation that is making the cast-off material glow.

The "butterfly" stretches for more than two light-years but the central star itself is hidden within a doughnut-shaped ring of dust, which constricts the star's outflow, creating the classic "bipolar" or hourglass shape. The nebula's reddish outer edges are largely due to light emitted by nitrogen, which marks the coolest gas visible in the picture and the white-colored regions are areas where light is emitted by sulfur.

Carina Nebula

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This painting is an artistic rendition of one of the largest panoramic images ever taken with Hubble's cameras. It is a 50-light-year-wide view of the central region of the Carina Nebula where a maelstrom of star birth - and death - is taking place. The immense nebula is an estimated 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina the Keel (of the old southern constellation Argo Navis, the ship of Jason and the Argonauts, from Greek mythology). The fantasy-like landscape of the nebula is sculpted by the action of outflowing winds and scorching ultraviolet radiation from the monster stars that inhabit this inferno. In the process, these stars are shredding the surrounding material that is the last vestige of the giant cloud from which the stars were born. The immense nebula contains at least a dozen brilliant stars that are roughly estimated to be at least 50 to 100 times the mass of our Sun. The most unique and opulent inhabitant is the star Eta Carinae, at far left. Eta Carinae is in the final stages of its brief and eruptive lifespan, as evidenced by two billowing lobes of gas and dust that presage its upcoming explosion as a titanic supernova. The fireworks in the Carina region started three million years ago when the nebula's first generation of newborn stars condensed and ignited in the middle of a huge cloud of cold molecular hydrogen. Radiation from these stars carved out an expanding bubble of hot gas. The island-like clumps of dark clouds scattered across the nebula are nodules of dust and gas that are resisting being eaten away by photoionization. The hurricane blast of stellar winds and blistering ultraviolet radiation within the cavity is now compressing the surrounding walls of cold hydrogen. This is triggering a second stage of new star formation. The image is a mosaic of the Carina Nebula taken in the light of neutral hydrogen with color information added - Red corresponds to sulfur, Green to hydrogen, and Blue to oxygen emission.

Anti - Carina Nebula

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This painting is an artistic rendition of one of the largest panoramic images ever taken with Hubble's cameras that has been color inverted. It is a 50-light-year-wide view of the central region of the Carina Nebula where a maelstrom of star birth - and death - is taking place. The immense nebula is an estimated 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina the Keel (of the old southern constellation Argo Navis, the ship of Jason and the Argonauts, from Greek mythology).  The image is a mosaic of the Carina Nebula taken in the light of neutral hydrogen with color information added - Blue corresponds to sulfur, Magenta to hydrogen, and Red to oxygen emission.

Cartwheel galaxy

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Approximately 100 million years ago, a smaller galaxy plunged through the heart of Cartwheel galaxy, creating ripples of an ultraviolet-bright blue outer ring (Galaxy Evolution Explorer), the clumps of pink along the outer blue ring are regions of both X-rays (Chandra X-ray Observatory) and ultraviolet radiation, the yellow-orange inner ring and nucleus at the center of the galaxy result from the combination of visible and infrared light representing the second ripple, the wisps of red (Spitzer Space Telescope) spread throughout the interior of the galaxy are organic molecules that have been illuminated by nearby low-level star formation, and the tints of green (Hubble Space Telescope ) are less massive, older visible-light stars.

The interpretation of the Cartwheel galaxy is a false-color composite image that also shows two of three colliding galaxy candidates to the bottom left of the ring, one as a neon blob and the other as a green spiral.

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Cat’s Eye

An artistic interpretation of a planetary nebula that forms when Sun-like stars gently eject their outer gaseous layers that form bright nebulae with amazing and confounding shapes. Ejecting its mass in a series of pulses (at 1,500-year intervals) the convulsions created concentric dust shells make a layered, onion-skin structure around the dying star.

 

 

 

 

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Silk Twill 39” X 39”
Eskimo Nebula

An artistic interpretation of the majestic view of the glowing remains of a dying star resembles a face surrounded by a fur parka. The "parka" is a disk of material embellished with a ring of comet-shaped objects, with their tails streaming away from the central, dying star - the "face" in this bright central region resembles a ball of twine where two elliptically shaped bubbles of material are blown into space by the star's intense "wind" of high-speed material. The comet-shaped features in the "parka" are formed from a collision of slow- and fast-moving gases and the nebula's glowing gases produce the colors for nitrogen (red), hydrogen (green), oxygen (blue), and helium (violet).

 

 

Hour Glass

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An artistic interpretation of a "Twin Jet Nebula" where each side of it appears much like a pair of super-super-sonic exhausts where the velocity of the gas exceeds 200 miles per second. The central star is known to be one of a very close pair which orbit one another at perilously close distances with one star is being engulfed by the other where the gravity of one star pulls weakly bound gas from the surface of the other and flings it into a thin, dense disk which surrounds both stars and extends well into space. The high-speed wind from one of the stars rams into the surrounding disk, which serves as a nozzle. The wind is deflected in a perpendicular direction and forms the pair of collimated jets where we see neutral oxygen shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

Anti - Butterfly

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An artistic interpretation of  this color inverted Nebula that looks like delicate butterfly wings are actually roiling cauldrons of  heated gas tearing across space at more than 600,000 miles an hour with the envelopes of gases unleashing  streams of ultraviolet radiation that is making the cast-off material glow.  The "butterfly" stretches for more than two light-years but the central star itself is hidden within a doughnut-shaped ring of dust, which constricts the star's outflow, creating the classic "bipolar" or hourglass shape. The nebula's bluish outer edges are largely due to light emitted by nitrogen, which marks the coolest gas visible in the picture and the black-colored regions are areas where light is emitted by sulfur.

 

Anti - Cat's Eye

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Silk Twill 21”X72”
An artistic interpretation of a planetary nebula that forms when Sun-like stars gently eject their outer gaseous layers that form bright nebulae with amazing and confounding shapes. Ejecting its mass in a series of pulses (at 1,500-year intervals) the convulsions created concentric dust shells make a layered, onion-skin structure around the dying star.

 

 

Anti - Hour Glass

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An artistic interpretation of a color inverted "Twin Jet Nebula" where each side of it appears much like a pair of super-super-sonic exhausts where the velocity of the gas exceeds 200 miles per second. The central star is known to be one of a very close pair which orbit one another at perilously close distances with one star is being engulfed by the other where the gravity of one star pulls weakly bound gas from the surface of the other and flings it into a thin, dense disk which surrounds both stars and extends well into space. The high-speed wind from one of the stars rams into the surrounding disk, which serves as a nozzle. The wind is deflected in a perpendicular direction and forms the pair of collimated jets where we see neutral oxygen shown in blue, once-ionized nitrogen in purple, and twice-ionized oxygen in red.

 

Jet in Carina

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Hubble (new Wide Field Camera 3) composite image of Carina Nebula, located 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina, made from filters that isolate emission from iron, magnesium, oxygen, hydrogen, and sulfur of the gas and dust in this tempestuous stellar nursery. The painting depicts the tip of the 3-light-year-long pillar, bathed in the glow of light from hot, massive stars and their scorching radiation and fast streams of charged particles that both sculpture the pillar and stream from the top of the structure.

 

Anti - Jet in Carina

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Hubble (new Wide Field Camera 3) composite image of Carina Nebula, located 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina, made from filters that isolate emission from iron, magnesium, oxygen, hydrogen, and sulfur of the gas and dust in this tempestuous stellar nursery. The colors have been inverted.

The painting depicts the tip of the 3-light-year-long pillar, bathed in the glow of light from hot, massive stars and their scorching radiation and fast streams of charged particles that both sculpture the pillar and stream from the top of the structure.

 

Light Echo

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Hubble image of an expanding halo of light around a distant star, named V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon). The illumination of interstellar dust comes from the red supergiant star at the middle of the image, V838 Mon, that is located about 20,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Monoceros, placing the star at the outer edge of our Milky Way galaxy. Called a light echo, the expanding illumination of a dusty cloud around the star has been revealing remarkable structures including swirls or eddies in the dusty cloud. These eddies are probably caused by turbulence in the dust and gas around the star as they slowly expand away.

Anti - Light Echo

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Hubble image of an expanding halo of light around a distant star, named V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon) that has been color inverted. The illumination of interstellar dust comes from the red supergiant star at the middle of the image, V838 Mon, that is located about 20,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Monoceros, placing the star at the outer edge of our Milky Way galaxy. Called a light echo, the expanding illumination of a dusty cloud around the star has been revealing remarkable structures including swirls or eddies in the dusty cloud. These eddies are probably caused by turbulence in the dust and gas around the star as they slowly expand away.

 

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Orion Nebula

This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Hubble Space Telescope color mosaic of the Orion Nebula - M42 {NGC 1976} reveals numerous treasures that reside within the nearby intense star- forming region where areas of light and dark blend with a palette of colors mix to form rich swirls and fluid motions. The bright star toward the upper left of the image, known as LP P Ori, is surrounded by a prominent reflection nebula where the star is moving within another veil of material that lies in front of M42 - the bright rim below LP Ori indicates that the teardrop shaped dark region around the illuminating star to be a cavity formed as the star moves through the veil material.

 

 

The Mice

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Hubble view of a spectacular pair of colliding galaxies, known as NGC 4676, in the constellation Coma Berenices, located 300 million light-years away, the have been nicknamed "The Mice" because of the long tails of stars and gas emanating from each galaxy. Otherwise known as NGC 4676, the pair will eventually merge into a single giant galaxy. In the galaxy at left, the bright blue patch is resolved into a vigorous cascade of clusters and associations of young, hot blue stars, whose formation has been triggered by the tidal forces of the gravitational interaction. Streams of material can also be seen flowing between the two galaxies. The clumps of young stars in the long, straight tidal tail [upper right] are separated by fainter regions of material. These dim regions suggest that the clumps of stars have formed from the gravitational collapse of the gas and dust that once occupied those areas. This picture is assembled from three sets of images in blue, orange, and near-infrared filters.

Anti - Mice

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Hubble view of a spectacular pair of colliding galaxies, known as NGC 4676, in the constellation Coma Berenices, located 300 million light-years away, the have been nicknamed "The Mice" because of the long tails of stars and gas emanating from each galaxy. Otherwise known as NGC 4676, the pair will eventually merge into a single giant galaxy. In the galaxy at left, the color inverted dark brown patch is resolved into a vigorous cascade of clusters and associations of young, hot blue stars, whose formation has been triggered by the tidal forces of the gravitational interaction. Streams of material can also be seen flowing between the two galaxies. The clumps of young stars in the long, straight tidal tail [upper right] are separated by fainter regions of material. These bright regions suggest that the clumps of stars have formed from the gravitational collapse of the gas and dust that once occupied those areas. This picture is assembled from three sets of images in blue, orange, and near-infrared filters.

 

Crab Nebula

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a supernova remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion that was observe red in China and Japan in 1054. The orange filaments are the tattered remains of the star and consist mostly of hydrogen. The rapidly spinning neutron star embedded in the center of the nebula is the dynamo powering the nebula's eerie interior bluish glow. The colors in the image indicate the different elements that were expelled during the explosion. Blue in the filaments in the outer part of the nebula represents neutral oxygen, green is singly-ionized sulfur, and red indicates doubly-ionized oxygen.

 

Anti - Crab Nebula

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An artistic interpretation of a supernova remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion that was observed in China and Japan in 1054. The color inverted Purple filaments are the tattered remains of the star and consist mostly of hydrogen. The rapidly spinning neutron star embedded in the center of the nebula is the dynamo powering the nebula's eerie interior bluish glow. The colors in the image indicate the different elements that were expelled during the explosion. Red in the filaments in the outer part of the nebula represents neutral oxygen,Magenta is singly-ionized sulfur, and Green indicates doubly-ionized oxygen.

 

Mystic Mountain

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An artistic interpretation of a small portion of the Carina Nebula, one of the largest seen star-birth regions in the galaxy, where towers of cool hydrogen laced with dust rise from the wall of the nebula. This painting captures the top of a three-light-year-tall pillar of gas and dust that is being eaten away by the brilliant light from nearby bright stars. The pillar is also being pushed apart from within, as infant stars buried inside it fire off jets of gas that can be seen streaming from towering peaks like arrows sailing through the air.

 

 

 

Anti-Mystic Mountain

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An artistic interpretation of a color inverted version of a small portion of the Carina Nebula, one of the largest seen star-birth regions in the galaxy, where towers of cool hydrogen laced with dust rise from the wall of the nebula. This painting captures the top of a three-light-year-tall pillar of gas and dust that is being eaten away by the brilliant light from nearby bright stars. The pillar is also being pushed apart from within, as infant stars buried inside it fire off jets of gas that can be seen streaming from towering peaks like arrows sailing through the air.

 

 

Pre-natal Cocoon

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Located in the constellation of Centaurus, about 10,000 light years away, a giant young star - twenty times the mass of our Sun, and five times its radius – was detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope and found to be still surrounded by its baby blanket of a massive disk of dust and gas. The presence of a disk is strong evidence that even the largest stars in our galaxy are formed in the same way as smaller ones - born from the collapse of huge clouds of dust and gas, rather than from the merging of smaller stars.

 

Anti - Pre-natal Cocoon

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Located in the constellation of Centaurus, about 10,000 light years away, a giant young star - twenty times the mass of our Sun, and five times its radius – was detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope and found to be still surrounded by its baby blanket of a massive disk of dust and gas. The presence of a disk is strong evidence that even the largest stars in our galaxy are formed in the same way as smaller ones - born from the collapse of huge clouds of dust and gas, rather than from the merging of smaller stars.

 

 

Starry Night

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of spirals of dust swirling across trillions of miles of interstellar space. The brilliant explosion of red supergiant star at the middle of the image (V838 Mon) illuminates interstellar dust ejected from the star in a previous explosion. The swirls or eddies in the dusty cloud demonstrate the turbulence in the dust and gas around the star as they slowly expand away two years from explosion.

 

 

 

Anti - Starry Night

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of spirals of dust swirling across trillions of miles of interstellar space. The colors have been inverted. The brilliant explosion of red supergiant star at the middle of the image (V838 Mon) illuminates interstellar dust ejected from the star in a previous explosion. The swirls or eddies in the dusty cloud demonstrate the turbulence in the dust and gas around the star as they slowly expand away two years from explosion.

 

 

Stellar 'Family Tree'

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Spitzer infrared portrait of the constellation Cassiopeia, that spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away, in the wispy star-forming region called W5. The image consists of a three-color composite of infrared observations - blue representing 3.6-micron light, green representing 8 micron light, and red representing 24-micron light. The oldest stars can be seen as red dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other blue dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as pink dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The white knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming. Red shows heated dust that pervades the region's cavities, while green highlights dense clouds. Like other massive star-forming regions W5 contains large cavities that were carved out by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars.

 

Anti - Stellar 'Family Tree'

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Spitzer infrared portrait of the constellation Cassiopeia, that spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away, in the wispy star-forming region called W5. The image consists of a three-color inverted composite of infrared observations - red representing 3.6-micron light, purple representing 8 micron light, and blue representing 24-micron light. The oldest stars can be seen as blue dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other red dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as green dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The black knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming. Blue shows heated dust that pervades the region's cavities, while pink highlights dense clouds.

Stellar Maternity

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A typical star-forming environment where the entire star formation history is printed into the features of the nebula: arcs, blobs, pillars, and rings of dust that tells a story of stellar winds from young stars that impact the stellar environment and the material ejected from older stars.

 

 

 

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Anti - Stellar Maternity

A typical star-forming environment where the entire star formation history is printed into the features of the nebula: arcs, blobs, pillars, and rings of dust that tells a story of stellar winds from young stars that impact the stellar environment and the material ejected from older stars.

 

 

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Supergiant Monocerotis

An artistic interpretation of spirals of dust swirling across trillions of miles of interstellar space. The brilliant explosion of red supergiant star at the middle of the image illuminates interstellar dust ejected from the star in a previous explosion. The swirls or eddies in the dusty cloud demonstrate the turbu-lence in the dust and gas around the star as they slowly expand away two years from explosion.

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Anti - Supergiant Monocerotis

An artistic interpretation of color inverted spirals of dust swirling across trillions of miles of interstellar space. The brilliant explosion of red supergiant star at the middle of the image illuminates interstellar dust ejected from the star in a previous explosion. The swirls or eddies in the dusty cloud demonstrate the turbu-lence in the dust and gas around the star as they slowly expand away two years from explosion.

 

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Super Cluster

The orange blob is the core of the original galaxy consisting mainly of old stars criss-crossed by filaments of dust which appears brown in the image, with the brilliant blue star-forming regions dotted about and surrounded by glowing hydrogen gas, appearing in the image in pink.

 

Trifid Nebula

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An artistic interpretation of this Nebula offers a close-up interpretation of the center of the Trifid Nebula, near the intersection of the dust bands, where a group of recently formed, massive, bright stars is easily visible. Three huge intersecting dark lanes of obscuring interstellar dust make the Trifid Nebula one of the most recognizable and striking star birth regions in the night sky. The dust, silhouetted against glowing gas and illuminated by starlight, cradles the bright stars at its heart that lies within our own Milky Way Galaxy about 9,000 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Sagittarius.

 

Anti - Trifid Nebula

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An artistic interpretation of this Nebula offers a close-up interpretation of the center of the Trifid Nebula, near the intersection of the dust bands, where a group of recently formed, massive, bright stars is easily visible. Three huge intersecting dark lanes of obscuring interstellar dust make the Trifid Nebula one of the most recognizable and striking star birth regions in the night sky. The dust, silhouetted against glowing gas and illuminated by starlight, cradles the bright stars at its heart that lies within our own Milky Way Galaxy about 9,000 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Sagittarius.

 

Veil Nebula

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Hubble photograph of a small portion of the Veil Nebula the shattered remains of a supernova that exploded thousands of years ago. This of image provides beautifully detailed views of the delicate, wispy structure resulting from this cosmic explosion. . The intertwined rope-like filaments of gas result from the enormous amounts of energy released as the fast-moving debris from the explosion plows into its surroundings and creates shock fronts. These shocks, driven by debris moving at 600,000 kilometers per hour, heat the gas to millions of degrees. It is the subsequent cooling of this material that produces the brilliant glowing colors that indicate emission from different kinds of atoms excited by the shock: blue shows oxygen, green shows sulfur, and red shows hydrogen. The Veil Nebula, also known as the Cygnus Loop, is located in the constellation of Cygnus, the Swan (1,500 light-years from Earth), is a prototypical middle-aged supernova remnant that has an unobscured location in our Galaxy, is relative close, and is of large size with the entire shell spanning about 3 degrees on the sky (corresponding to about 6 full moons). Stars in galaxies are born and then die. How long a star lives depends on how massive it is. The more massive the star, the shorter its life. When a star significantly more massive than our Sun runs out of fuel, it collapses and blows itself apart in a catastrophic supernova explosion. A supernova releases so much light that it can outshine a whole galaxy of stars put together. The exploding star sweeps out a huge bubble in its surroundings, fringed with actual stellar debris along with material swept up by the blast wave. This glowing, brightly colored shell of gas forms a nebula that astronomers call a "supernova remnant." Although only about one star per century in our Galaxy will end its life in this spectacular way, these explosions are responsible for making all chemical elements heavier than iron, as well as being the main producers of oxygen in the universe. Elements such as copper, mercury, gold, and lead are forged in these violent events. The expanding shells of supernova remnants mix with other clouds in the Milky Way and become the raw material for new generations of stars and planets. The chemical elements that constitute Earth, and indeed those of which we ourselves are made, were formed deep inside ancient stars and distributed by supernova explosions in nebulae like the one painted here.

 

Anti - Veil Nebula

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This painting is an artistic interpretation of a Hubble photograph of a small portion of the Veil Nebula — the shattered remains of a supernova that exploded thousands of years ago. This of image provides beautifully detailed views of the delicate, wispy structure resulting from this cosmic explosion.  The intertwined rope-like filaments of gas result from the enormous amounts of energy released as the fast-moving debris from the explosion plows into its surroundings and creates shock fronts. These shocks, driven by debris moving at 600,000 kilometers per hour, heat the gas to millions of degrees. It is the subsequent cooling of this material that produces the brilliant glowing colors that indicate emission from different kinds of atoms excited by the shock. The inverted colors of red shows oxygen, magenta shows sulfur, and blue shows hydrogen. The Veil Nebula, also known as the Cygnus Loop, is located in the constellation of Cygnus, the Swan (1,500 light-years from Earth), is a prototypical middle-aged supernova remnant that has an unobscured location in our Galaxy, is relative close, and is of large size with the entire shell spanning about 3 degrees on the sky (corresponding to about 6 full moons). Stars in galaxies are born and then die. How long a star lives depends on how massive it is. The more massive the star, the shorter its life. When a star significantly more massive than our Sun runs out of fuel, it collapses and blows itself apart in a catastrophic supernova explosion. A supernova releases so much light that it can outshine a whole galaxy of stars put together. The exploding star sweeps out a huge bubble in its surroundings, fringed with actual stellar debris along with material swept up by the blast wave. This glowing, brightly colored shell of gas forms a nebula that astronomers call a "supernova remnant."

Green Lantern

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This artistic interpretation of the Green Lantern Nebula portrays rings of dust glowing in infrared colors heated by a couple of giant stars’ intense ultraviolet radiation. The green color represents infrared light coming from tiny hydrocarbon dust grains that have been destroyed inside the bubble. The red color inside the ring represents larger hotter dust grains.

Giant "O" stars are the most massive type of star known to exist. This one, named RCW 120, can be found in the murky clouds encircled by the tail of the constellation Scorpius.

 

Cartwheel Galaxy

This artistic interpretation of the Cartwheel Galaxy was inspired by a false-color composite image of colliding galaxies with two to the bottom left of the ring, one as a neon blob and the other as a green spiral.

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Approximately 100 million years ago, a smaller galaxy plunged through the heart of the Cartwheel galaxy, creating ripples of an ultraviolet-bright blue outer ring. The clumps of pink along the outer blue ring are regions of both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The yellow-orange inner ring and nucleus at the center of the galaxy result from the combination of visible and infrared light representing the second ripple. The wisps of red spread throughout the interior of the galaxy are organic molecules that have been illuminated by nearby low-level star formation. And, the tints of green are less massive, older visible-light stars.

 

Anti - Cartwheel Galaxy

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This artistic interpretation of the Cartwheel Galaxy was inspired by a false-color inverted composite image of colliding galaxies with two to the bottom left of the ring, one as a neon blob and the other as a green spiral.

Approximately 100 million years ago, a smaller galaxy plunged through the heart of the Cartwheel galaxy, creating ripples of an ultraviolet brown outer ring. The clumps of green along the outer brown ring are regions of both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The blue-green inner ring and nucleus at the center of the galaxy result from the combination of visible and infrared light representing the second ripple. The wisps of blue spread throughout the interior of the galaxy are organic molecules that have been illuminated by nearby low-level star formation. And, the tints of pink are less massive, older visible-light stars.

Supernova Cassiopeia

This represents an artistic interpretation of the of a false-color image from the aftermath of a fiery supernova blast of the star Cassiopeia A.

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At the center of this orb, visible only as a tiny turquoise dot, is the leftover corpse of the now-dead neutron star. The multi-hued shell outside the neutron star is the rest of the original star's still hot and glowing scattered remains.

 

 

Anti - Supernova Cassiopeia

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This represents an artistic interpretation of the of an inverted false-color image from the aftermath of a fiery supernova blast of the star Cassiopeia A.

At the center of this orb, visible only as a tiny pink dot, is the leftover corpse of the now-dead neutron star. The multi-hued shell outside the neutron star is the rest of the original star's still hot and glowing scattered remains.

 

 

Perseus Nebula

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This artistic interpretation of the Perseus Nebula portrays a large green cloud of organic molecules that have been illuminated by the nearby star formation. Wisps of orange-red are dust particles warmed by the newly forming stars. The pinkish color indicates that these infant stars are still shrouded by the cosmic dust and gas that collapsed to form them.

 

 

 

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Anti - Perseus Nebula

This color inverted artistic interpretation of the Perseus Nebula portrays a large pink cloud of organic molecules that have been illuminated by the nearby star formation. Wisps of green-blue are dust particles warmed by the newly forming stars. The greenish color indicates that these infant stars are still shrouded by the cosmic dust and gas that collapsed to form them.

 

 

Dead Star

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This artistic interpretation of the supernova exploded and now-dead star Cassiopeia A, where much of the star's original layering preserved in false-color. The faint, blue glow (3.6-micron light) surrounding the dead star is material that was energized by a forward shock wave created when the star blew up and now located at the outer edge of the blue glow, while other material seen in green (4.5-micron light), yellow and red (8.0-micron light) represent material ejected in the explosion and heated by a slower reverse shock wave.

 

 

How to tie a scarf!

Credit: EILEEN FISHER

Posted by Hñiñ on Thursday, February 18, 2016